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20130318
20130326
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because of the negotiations over the debt ceiling. the administration wanted to clean increase in the debt ceiling. when we were facing a potential disaster because of reluctance on the part of congress to raise the debt ceiling. we saw a solution which we hope would not be put in place. no one expected it to be put in place. the idea was to have a commitment mechanism we wouldn't need to force us to make better policy decisions on the sequester. and in the negotiations, what i was referring to was the fiscal cliff negotiations at the end of last year, where the matters were very close. the president did not ask for more revenue in those negotiations. he actually asked for less. he had 1.6 trillion in his budget, came down to 1.2 trillion. i will point out charlie the president has done unusual he's kept his last offer on the table. he didn't retreat and say no i want to go back to that original figure. he kept some very difficult offers on the table to reach a bargain, including entitlement reforms. and so the president has been looking for a balanced way to do this. and in some sense it'
debt ceiling issues and then our -- obviously, o national debt and deficits -- neil: are they whistling past the graveyard? >> we'll have an adjustment. i hope not. i hope we continue to build incomes up, keep the corporate profits up, but unless we reform the tax code, unless we reform, obviously, the entitlement programs, unless we get debt and deficit and fiscal issues under control, we're in trouble. neil: senator, i thought you were swimming upstream in massachusetts. amazing, ted kennedy's seat, shocking, actually. maybe you set sights on a national stage where your argument resinates more among folks in the country. are you interested in that? >> i think you need people like me and others. you have rubio, portman, thune, good republicans, a lot of good democrats who bring a common sense approach to who we are -- neil: i know that, but would you specifically, scott brown? >> i'm not ruling anything out, but now i'm happy and honored to be a fox contributor. i'll recharge engines and bring my message to the american people and remind them and challenge them -- i want to challenge t
on the debt ceiling before his re-election. >> true. >> and so he forced this process to occur and insisted. >> but he didn't want the sequester cuts. >> well, no. he didn't want the cuts, but we had the sequester as a result of his demands. and i'm told my colleagues in the house that the sequester will stay in effect until there is an agreement that will include cuts and reforms that put us on a path to balance the budget over the next ten years. >> but no tax increases. >> no tax increases. the president already got $650 billion worth of tax increases january 1st. he got a trillion dollars worth of tax increases in obama care. this year the federal government will bring in more revenue than any year in our history and yet we're still going to have a trillion dollars budget deficit. spending is the problem. >> the white house says in response, yes, it's true. taxes went up more than $600 billion over ten years at the end of the year but it is also true the white house put $1.5 trillion worth of spending cuts in their budget. the truth is you're both right. i mean, they have offered spendi
development, which is this idea of what will congress do when it hits the debt ceiling. you can see the past two surveys, nearly 90% of respondents think congress will raise the debt ceiling every time it's reached. let's move on to what wall street thinks -- will they consider with the sequester? yes. will it consider and change the makeup. 33% say yes. should it increase spending cuts? 21 #% said. bottom line, only 17% a year think congress should reduce the spending cuts. if you add all of this up together, what you find is a large number who believe congress should keep the plan but they want a little flexibility. how urgent is it? 80% of the march survey said congress should urgently enact a sustainable deficit plan. that has come down to 67% with 25% agreeing that it needs a little more time. that group of respondents, 54 of them market participants say that they should be reducing the deficit. here's some of the can comments. the only thing the economy has to fear is washington itself. an interesting comment. the public wants less cutting of the budget. they are seen as positive. the
't and jumped out at me. one of the things we heard going back to the debt ceiling negotiations in the summer of 2011, john boehner saying in effect the president played loosesy and -- lucy and yanked football and was not keeping his word on obligations he said he would undertake. i wonder if joe biden going back to offer a at this time for at that time argument? would be interesting to for reporters would follow up. what were the five occasions? what were the specific deals and how did republicans back out at them? bill: what date did it happen and what did republicans supposedly promise you and how did they renege on that. >> right. bill: here is john boehner, 10 days ago, similar topic here. listen to the speaker. >> republicans want to balance the budget. the president doesn't. republicans want to solve our long-term debt problem. the president doesn't. we want to unlock our energy resources to put more americans back to work. the president doesn't. bill: he also said it will take more than dinner dates and phone calls. and that goes back to your point about the charm offensive. like, wha
and the debt ceiling. it seemed like he was a on a roll in the early weeks. >> right, jon, but that may establish the point which is, that if you start out with a lower level of popularity than presidents traditionally started out, their second term, you have further to fall, to rise in the polls if you're numbers go up but you have less to fall if, below to get that below that 50% mark. if you start out with a highly partisan, politicized electorate they will really come down on you like a ton of bricks if you do anything they don't like, which is a point that nate silver made in a recent analysis on the polling drop. i think coming right after this, the president's, what seems to be a very successful trip to the middle east just shows you that the american people are focused on the economy and they're focused on economic uncertainty. they're not focused on foreign policy as much as some of us would like, they really care about whether or not he's going to deliver any economic prosperity in the second term. jon: as we look at that video of the president shaking hands with world leaders
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)

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